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AHRC-funded LBAS development period

Strand 1: Identities and Cultures in East Asia

This strand focuses on WREAC's core research strengths in the arts and humanities, particularly in the study of literature, theatre and performance in China, history in East Asia and film in Japan. Projects include:

(a) Staging China, WREAC's highly successful international network on Chinese theatre and performance uses Chinese theatre as a 'cultural bridge' to build dialogue and mutual understanding of cultural heritages, languages, narratives, values, beliefs, and histories. Activities cover PGR language training, PGR project assistant work and the creation of an electronic repository of Chinese theatre resources that will be piloted among the 40+ national and international network partners before public dissemination.

This project is a continuation of 'Performing China on the Global Stage', which examined the creative processes and the social roles of theatre in China through the development of a global practice-led network in Sinology and Cultural and Performance Studies in collaboration with the Leeds School for Performance and Cultural Industries, WUN partner universities, professional theatres, and 40 other partners worldwide.

The project is led by Dr Ruru Li and Susan Daniels, University of Leeds.

More information about this research project and its activities can be found here.

External project website: http://www.stagingchina.leeds.ac.uk/

(b) Writing Chinese, a new international research network also emerging from the work of WREAC's core researchers in the arts and humanities, focuses on authors and authorship in China. It has developed a dynamic and interactive website designed to attract practicing authors and UK-based and international academics interested in theorist-practitioner collaboration, as well as members of the public who are interested in Chinese literature and culture.

The project is led by Dr Frances Weightman, University of Leeds.

More information about this research project and its activities can be found here.

External project website: http://writingchinese.leeds.ac.uk/

(c) Ruptured Pasts is a new research network that explores how communities in contemporary China and Japan use the arts and humanities to confront the challenges that come from rapid social change and troubling pasts. This project will be developed across the LBAS network to broaden the scope to other geographical and historical contexts.

The project is led by Dr Marjorie Dryburgh, University of Sheffield.

More information about this research project and its activities can be found here.

(d) Although now ended, the Mixed Cinema Network project studied the cultural context of film and the media in Japan, China, Taiwan and Korea through collaboration with the Centre for World Cinemas (Leeds) and the White Rose Mixed Cinema Network (MCN). It engaged with film, art organisations and international festivals and developed networks embracing Australia, Denmark, Japan, China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Korea and New Zealand.

The project was led by Professor Lúcia Nagib, previously University of Leeds, now University of Reading.

More information about this research project and its activities can be found here.

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Strand 2: Cross-cultural Encounters and Globalisation

This strand builds on research and training in the fields of cultural diplomacy, internationalisation, Sino-Japanese relations and transformations within East Asia. Projects include:

(a) Informal Political Actors in East Asia, Russia and the Arab World, under the broad label of cultural diplomacy, this project explores the role of informal actors in East Asian (and Russian and Arabic) international relations through the establishment of a cross-LBAS and international research network.

This project is led by Dr Hugo Dobson, University of Sheffield.

More information about this research project and its activities can be found here.

(b) East Asian Soft Power, also under the cultural diplomacy umbrella, this project investigates various aspects of Chinese, Japanese and Korean soft power and its influence in other parts of the world.

This project is led by Professor Glenn Hook, University of Sheffield and Professor Caroline Rose, University of Leeds.

More information about this research project and its activities can be found here.

(c) Asian Religions Network, a collaboration with the British Inter-university China Centre, this network explores changing forms of religious authority in Asia against a backdrop of social change.

This project is led by former WREAC student Dr Jane Caple and Dr Erica Baffelli, both University of Manchester.

More information about this research project and its activities can be found here.

(d) Sino-Japanese Relations Research Network builds on initiatives bringing together scholars and PGRs in Sino-Japanese Studies through a series of themed conferences and workshops focusing on the history and memory of World War Two in the Asia Pacific, as well as Anglo-Japanese and Asia-Japanese reconciliation, and engaging NGOs with interests in war and reconciliation.

This project is led by Professor Caroline Rose, University of Leeds.

More information about this research project and its activities can be found here.

External project website:

(e) China and Japan Observatories, although now ended, this project used Chinese and Japanese language to access data and placed interns in Chinese- and Japanese-speaking environments to investigate the historical and cultural dimensions of East Asian internationalisation, and the changing trajectories of East Asian company behaviour in the UK and the EU.

This project was led by Professor Jeremy Clegg, Dr Hinrich Voss and Dr Sierk Horn, all University of Leeds.

More information about this research project and its activities can be found here.

(f) Japan's Shrinking Regions, also now ended, used internships, international networks and links with Japanese and British public bodies to examine community well-being and connectedness in Japan's shrinking regions, and compared the effects of depopulation on such countries as Korea and the UK.

This project was led by Dr Peter Matanle, University of Sheffield.

More information about this research project and its activities can be found here.

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Strand 3: Networks in Chinese and Japanese Language

This strand focuses on training methodologies and research in Chinese and Japanese language. Projects include: 

(a) Teaching Chinese as a Second Language, this project has developed an international network of Supervisors in Teaching Chinese as a Second Language to exchange experience of supervision, and to discuss, develop and coordinate best practice in learning and teaching, while promoting the development of Chinese linguistics.

The project is led by Dr Yang Lan, University of Leeds and Dr Lily Chen, University of Sheffield.

More information about this research project and its activities can be found here.

(b) Tandem Japanese and Japanese Language Training, this project has established a tandem Japanese network where native/non-native speaker-student pairs work together to improve each other's language skills, communicate the purposes of their work in engaging with the academic community of their target language area, and realise opportunities for career development.

In its second phase, this project is now focusing on teaching methodologies, in particular the development of online materials and transitions in language learning.

The project was established by Dr Thomas McAuley, Dr Mark Pendleton and Miyuki Nagai, University of Sheffield, and now has Yuka Oeda at Leeds as a collaborator.

More information about this research project and its activities can be found here.

(c) Although now ended, the Negotiating with Asia project examined how recent cultural changes in Japan and China have altered negotiation expectations and practices among Japanese and Chinese negotiators and how this can inform Western business and public policy-making practitioners working in East Asia."

This project was led by Dr Harald Conrad, University of Sheffield.

More information about this research project and its activities can be found here.

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